1. spacettf:

    Apollo 15 Saturn V Launch by NASA on The Commons on Flickr.

    Tramite Flickr:
    The 363-foot tall Apollo 15 Saturn V is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 9:34:00.79 a.m., July 26, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. Note that the launch is reflected in a body of water across from the launch complex.

    Image # : S71-41810

     
  2. sagansense:

    Tomorrow, we (Melissa - aka lawngirl - and I) are not quite en route to orbit, but close enough…the world’s largest aviation event, EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, WI!

    (Source: cineraria)

     
  3. hiphiphoorayok:

    Remembering Apollo 15.

    (via from-the-earth-to-the-moon13)

     
  4. retrobaltimore:

    Apollo 11 astronauts return from the moon: The Sun Front Page: July 25, 1969

    Click on the newspaper above to get a closer view of the front page.

    (via from-the-earth-to-the-moon13)

     
  5. commandmodulepilot:

    Apollo 15 - Launched 43 Years ago today - Climb aboard the Lunar Rover…

    (via from-the-earth-to-the-moon13)

     
  6. from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

    Apollo 15 Launches 43 Years Ago Today (26 July 1971) —- The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 15 (Spacecraft 112/Lunar Module 10/Saturn 510) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, at 9:34:00:79 a.m. (EDT), July 26, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. Aboard the Apollo 15 spacecraft were astronauts David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. Apollo 15 is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) fourth manned lunar landing mission. While astronauts Scott and Irwin will descend in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon, astronaut Worden will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

     
  7. bretaa:

    Okay I’m finally posting the photos from Johnson Space Center from last week. But we got to see historic mission control from the Apollo days and today’s mission control, we also went to the NBL and we went to building 9. In building 9 we not only got an Ariel perspective from the gallery but we got a tour on the floor of all the simulators by astronaut Nicole Stott from STS-133 and we got a Q&A as well! The group photo is with David Cisco, technician for the lunar modules who designed the separation of the LM. He is also an author of the book Full Circle which he signed a copy of. It was an honor to spend the day with he and Nicole their stories are phenomenal!

    (via scienceyoucanlove)

     
  8. for-all-mankind:

    One of my favorite parts of any space center, a rocket garden provides a peaceful setting to observe and inspect the flight hardware that mankind has used in its quest to conquer the stars. Kennedy Space Center’s rocket garden was the best I have ever seen it when I visited yesterday, 23 July, 2014.

    Since I last visited, every rocket has been repainted. The bright red colors of the vehicle markings on the Saturn IB stood out to the most to me. One of my favorite rockets, I remember the IB at Kennedy Space Center severely deteriorated, paint faded and metal rusted. Not the case anymore.

    The relatively recently refurbished Gemini Titan II has as it’s most defining feature it’s single LR-87 engine. Since the engine compartment faring was omitted on the Titan missile, the engines and nozzles are exposed more than on other rockets. This allows for great inspection of its complicated system of tubes, pipes, and wires.

    One element of the garden I was not able to capture recently are the rockets illuminated at night. The Saturn IB is draped in a dark blue, with each vertical rocket different illuminations of white. Ground lighting adds another level of beautiful ambiance to the garden, which takes on a totally different atmosphere after dark.

    (via sagansense)

     
  9. npr:

    "This Aspiring Astronaut Might Be The World’s Most Amazing Teen" via Linda Poon

    Move over, Zack Brown. When Gideon Gidori was 7, he knew he wanted to go into space. Now, the 15-year-old is using potato salad to fund his dream of becoming Tanzania’s first astronaut.

    – Alexander

    Image via Kickstarter

    (via sagansense)

     
  10. from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

    The Top Ten Moments of the Apollo Program- Recap

    Click Picture for caption!

     
  11. for-all-mankind:

    One of my favorite parts of any space center, a rocket garden provides a peaceful setting to observe and inspect the flight hardware that mankind has used in its quest to conquer the stars. Kennedy Space Center’s rocket garden was the best I have ever seen it when I visited yesterday, 23 July, 2014.

    Since I last visited, every rocket has been repainted. The bright red colors of the vehicle markings on the Saturn IB stood out to the most to me. One of my favorite rockets, I remember the IB at Kennedy Space Center severely deteriorated, paint faded and metal rusted. Not the case anymore.

    The relatively recently refurbished Gemini Titan II has as it’s most defining feature it’s single LR-87 engine. Since the engine compartment faring was omitted on the Titan missile, the engines and nozzles are exposed more than on other rockets. This allows for great inspection of its complicated system of tubes, pipes, and wires.

    One element of the garden I was not able to capture recently are the rockets illuminated at night. The Saturn IB is draped in a dark blue, with each vertical rocket different illuminations of white. Ground lighting adds another level of beautiful ambiance to the garden, which takes on a totally different atmosphere after dark.

    (via from-the-earth-to-the-moon13)

     
  12. projecthabu:

         Every rocket has a payload; even the small, solid fuel rocket that I built and fired while attending Space Camp as a child. My rocket launched an earthworm as its payload, carrying it about 1,000 feet above the ground. A parachute opened and brought my payload it back to the ground, alive and unscathed. Obviously, larger rockets tend to carry larger payloads. The Saturn V Moon rocket was the largest launch vehicle ever successfully flown. The whole point of the Saturn V was to lift this, the Lunar Stack, off of Earth, insert it into a brief period of Earth orbit, then push it toward the Moon.

         The Lunar Stack consisted of several systems. The very tip of the rocket is a component called the Launch Escape System. This was a tower fixed to the nose of the manned capsule during launch, which contained a solid rocket motor that would be fired if the rocket started to break up, pulling the crew to safety. Luckily, this never had to happen in the Apollo program. If everything was performing nominally, the Launch Escape System would be jettisoned away from the capsule after ignition of the S-II second stage.

         The next major system down the line is the Command-Service Module (CSM). This two-part component consists of the Command Module (CM) and the Service Module (SM). The CM carried all three astronauts during the whole flight, from launch, all the way to splash-down, excluding the time when two of the three astronauts would transfer to the Lunar Module (LM) for their excursion to the moon. The particular Command-Service Module pictured here is called CSM-115, which was manufactured for the cancelled Apollo 19 mission. It is only partially completed. Normally, the unflown Command Modules are a shiny silver color, but this module sat outside for decades, and has taken the appearance of one that has suffered an entry into the atmosphere. 

         The conical structure aft of the CSM is the Spacecraft-Lunar Adapter, which housed and protected the Lunar Module (LM), and the CSM engine during launch. Once the Lunar Stack was on a path to the moon, the CSM would detach from the SLA cone, which would open up like flower petals, exposing the LM. The CSM would turn 180°, dock with the LM, and pull it away from the S-IVB third stage. Then, the CSM and LM would continue their path to the Moon, separate from the S-IVB third stage.

         Each small component of the Apollo System, from the launch, to the Escape Tower, and everything in between, is incredible to me. I could go into endless detail about each small component within these systems, but that will have to wait for future articles.

    (via from-the-earth-to-the-moon13)

     
  13. humanoidhistory:

    Astronaut Mark Lee on a spacewalk outside the Space Shuttle Discovery during mission STS-82, February 1997.

     

  14. "

    We humans are one among millions of separate species who live in a world burgeoning, overflowing with life. And yet most species that ever were are no more. After flourishing for one hundred fifty million years, the dinosaurs became extinct. Every last one. No species is guaranteed its tenure on this planet.

    The hard truth seems to be this: We live in a vast and awesome universe in which, daily, suns are made and worlds are destroyed, where humanity clings to an obscure clod of rock. The significance of our lives and our fragile realm derives from our own wisdom and courage. We are the custodians of life’s meaning. We would prefer it to be otherwise, of course, but there is no compelling evidence for a cosmic Parent who will care for us and save us from ourselves. It is up to us.

    "
    — Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot (via whats-out-there)
     
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